2006-08-17 / Front Page

Talent abounds at the annual auditions

By Sam Bari

They've got talent The "Hummingbird Trio" auditioned to perform in tonight's talent show hosted by the Jamestown Community Chorus. The trio consists of Megan Liebovitz, Erin Maughan, and Celia Tafuri. Photo by Andrea von Hohenleiten They've got talent The "Hummingbird Trio" auditioned to perform in tonight's talent show hosted by the Jamestown Community Chorus. The trio consists of Megan Liebovitz, Erin Maughan, and Celia Tafuri. Photo by Andrea von Hohenleiten They came in every shape and size imaginable, old and young, and in between. They played instruments, sang, danced, and told jokes and stories. Whatever it took to charm, entertain, amuse, and pull at the heartstrings of the judges at the auditions for the annual Jamestown Community Chorus talent show - the hopeful performers did.

"Everything is as expected - unpredictable," said Jamestown Chorus Director B.J. Whitehouse as he flashed his trademark grin. He was speaking of the many degrees of talent presented by the performers trying out for this year's talent show. In the end, the long line of participants was pared down to about 20 different acts. At 7:30 tonight, they will give the audience their best performances at the Community Center as the community chorus presents its 2006 production of "Good Ol' Summertime."

Producer Janet Kirk and Assistant Producer Pat Perry have chosen some of Jamestown's favorite performers, and with the help of Marion Gomez, the production publicist, have made every effort to attract new and exciting talent to try out for this 17th annual fund-raiser for the chorus.

Damien Beecroft gave it his best shot with a rendition of "Desperado" by the Eagles, but did not make it into tonight's talent show. Damien Beecroft gave it his best shot with a rendition of "Desperado" by the Eagles, but did not make it into tonight's talent show. Of course, the ultimate decision maker for who gets the "hook" is Tom Pederson, director of this year's talent extravaganza. With the able assistance of Assistant Director Andrea von Hohenleiten, Pederson will attempt to make the production the envy of Broadway.

Frank Darigan, master of ceremonies for the last eight years, is sure to delight the audience with inventive and exciting introductions, and amusing dialogue with the audience.

Attendees are encouraged to come early for a good seat. The Jamestown Community Band will give the show a spectacular start. Chorus President Terry Horsley and Friends, Emily Anthony on violin, Janet Grant on piano, the Kathy Brownell Follies, Christopher Monti on guitar, Dana and Durga Larkin, and that marvelously charming act "Just for Fun" will be featured on tonight's program, which promises a wonderful evening's entertainment.

Ginger Holland, Andrea von Hohenleiten, and their able staff of 16 singers have been selling raffle tickets for over two weeks. Those attending the performance will also have an opportunity of purchasing raffle tickets at the show, where the drawing will be held. Prizes are $100, $75, and $50 in "Chamber Checks" redeemable at over 30 Jamestown businesses.

The silent auction overseen by Sylvia Monti, will feature a painting by Evelyn Rhodes, a family portrait package by Julia Montminy, a painting by Lynn Normand, a photograph of Brenton Point by Monty Gomez, a quilt or wall hanging by Dorrie Linn, and a Chinese style end table of Brazilian cherry by Tom Linn, and much more.

Dianne Reilly and her able staff will be on hand to serve delicious refreshments that are being offered for sale.

Talent show tickets are $7 for adults and $5 for seniors and children.

They can be purchased at Baker's Pharmacy, Jamestown Hardware, The Secret Garden, from chorus members, and at the door. For additional information, call 423-1574.

When Jamestown was founded in 1687, the only entertainment available to early settlers was provided by the settlers themselves. Usually one person could play the fiddle, another could sing, some could tell stories, and a few could dance. There were no traveling minstrel shows or symphonies, and certainly no rock concerts, television, or movies. Communities found their entertainment from within long after the country was settled. 17 years ago, the Jamestown Community Chorus resurrected that custom with their annual talent show. The program is a wonderful opportunity for our town to keep a very American tradition alive. It proves that we are still a resourceful, vibrant, self-sufficient community. Discovering the hidden talents in our neighbors brings us closer together, giving us a bond that has long been lost in many towns that have lost their identity to bigness.

The Jamestown Community Chorus encourages everyone to support this annual event that has become an integral part of the many treasures Jamestown has to offer.

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