2006-12-21 / Front Page

‘Dan In Real Life’ is going to reel life

By Sam Bari

‘Dan In Real Life’ is going to reel life

Roll’em Disney Studios took over East Ferry this week to film the final scenes of “Dan in Real Life.” Production wrapped up on Wednesday. Photo by Jeff McDonough Roll’em Disney Studios took over East Ferry this week to film the final scenes of “Dan in Real Life.” Production wrapped up on Wednesday. Photo by Jeff McDonough The last few scenes of the Disney movie “Dan In Real Life” are being shot at East Ferry, where the marina office has been turned into a book store for a few days. The production wraps on Wednesday, Dec. 20, and the trucks will start to roll out of town on Friday morning.

Paula LaBarre of Grapes and Gourmet liquor store and deli at East Ferry said, “The movie people were fabulous. They gave us a lot of business and caused a lot of business to come in. People gathered to watch the production and visited the store,” she said.

Ali Watson of East Ferry Deli agreed. “Some of the crew came in, and a lot of people that came down to watch paid us a visit. I’m sure business improved because they were here,” she said.

“Any time you have a large group of people come into a small town like ours with a couple of dozen huge trucks, there is going to be a certain amount of impact. It can’t be helped,” said Police Lieutenant Bill Donovan. He said he thought the movie people were as co-operative and sensitive about their intrusion as could be expected, and that they did a good job of keeping the inconvenience to a minimum. “All in all, we tried to be gracious hosts, and they did their best to be considerate guests. I think the production from the town’s point of view went smoothly, with more benefit to the town than inconvenience,” he added.

Juliette Binoche and Steve Carrell prepared for their next scene at East Ferry on Monday. Photo by Jeff McDonough Juliette Binoche and Steve Carrell prepared for their next scene at East Ferry on Monday. Photo by Jeff McDonough Bill Hamel of Pemberton Avenue lives directly across the street from the Portuguese American Citizens’ Club, where the DIRL crew set up base camp. He found the noise of generators and lights in the early hours of the morning to be disturbing and a tremendous inconvenience. He also complained about the large trucks parked on Pemberton Avenue, obstructing traffic and making access to the driveways across from where they parked difficult. A couple of his neighbors said they would not be unhappy to see the movie finished, but did not feel that the inconvenience was as unbearable as Hamel did. He said he felt that the trucks should not have been permitted to park on the street every night.

Amy Barclay of Trattoria Simpatico on Narragansett Avenue found the movie people were “absolutely wonderful. We prepared the food for the movie sets, and that was quite an experience. They gave us a tremendous amount of business, both on set and off. Groups of crew and cast members came to eat in the evenings,” she said. “They couldn’t have been nicer.”

Scott Levine and Eoin Walsh, the publicist and location manager for DIRL respectively, extended their thanks to the town officials and residents alike for making their stay enjoyable and productive. “We hope we weren’t too much of an inconvenience and that the town will welcome us back because we’d love to shoot here again. Jamestown has so much to offer,” Walsh said. Levine said that the town couldn’t have been more accommodating and concurred with Walsh about bringing more productions to the area.

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