2009-12-17 / Front Page

Police station addition just about complete

By Eileen M. Daly

Bill Burgin (left) and Chris Arner, both architects with Burgin Lambert Architects of Newport, stopped by the police station recently to check on the progress of the new addition. Burgin Lambert Architects designed both the original police station building and the added space. Photo by Jeff McDonough Bill Burgin (left) and Chris Arner, both architects with Burgin Lambert Architects of Newport, stopped by the police station recently to check on the progress of the new addition. Burgin Lambert Architects designed both the original police station building and the added space. Photo by Jeff McDonough If you have ever lived in a space while it was being renovated, you probably know the havoc that construction can bring about – dust, disruption and delays are often part of the process.

Fortunately, that hasn’t been the case during the renovation of Jamestown’s police station; in fact, it’s been smooth sailing, according to Lt. William Donovan of the Jamestown Police Dept., who said the new addition to the building will be completed on schedule.

“We are drawing up a punch list for any little things that need to be completed,” he said, adding that the list includes minor interior tasks like installing a doorstop or touching up paint.

The police station addition project included a new HVAC system for the entire building. The system, which cost approximately $150,000, is located on the second floor of the building. Photo by Jeff McDonough The police station addition project included a new HVAC system for the entire building. The system, which cost approximately $150,000, is located on the second floor of the building. Photo by Jeff McDonough “We are already occupying the new space,” he said.

That new space includes additional office space and a brand-new locker room and lockers. But the office space and locker room are only part of the construction plan, Donovan said.

According to Town Engineer Michael Gray, the project cost approximately $462,000 and included a 624-square-foot addition of office space and a 456-square-foot addition of locker room space for both men and women. Also completed, Gray said, was repainting of the entire interior and exterior of the building, as well as new tile floors in all spaces, new carpeting in the addition, some new furniture and new lockers for the locker rooms.

“It was almost a complete overhaul of the first floor,” Donovan said.

Gray agreed, adding, “We basically rehabbed the building and brought it back up to standards.”

According to Donovan, the building is approximately 19 years old, and the heating, ventilation and air conditioning systems all needed to be modernized.

“We found that it would be more cost effective to replace the old system with a more modern, energy-saving system. The old system was nearing the end of its lifespan and we’ve had our share of problems with it,” he said, adding that it cost a lot of money to keep the old system repaired and running.

The decision to replace the old unit was made “by the engineers,” according to Donovan. Gray said that of the total contract price for the renovations, approximately $150,000 was spent on HVAC upgrades for the entire building.

Donovan said the police station had become cramped and outdated over the years due to expanding personnel and the addition of new departments.

“We’ve taken on the animal control officer and the harbormaster, for instance,” he said. “The harbormaster’s office used to be in the recreational building.”

Previously, as new officers or departments needed space, they would have to share the limited available office space, Donovan said.

“Now they can have their own space,” he said.

The new construction has been right on schedule and the entire process has “gone smoothly,” according to Donovan.

As for the new locker room space, Donovan said, “the offi cers are jumping up and down and clicking their heels. They are no longer jammed and crammed now that the locker room has been expanded. The lockers are larger and no one has to share a locker.”

Some construction and site work still needs to be completed, but Donovan said most of that is outdoor work that will likely have to be put off until next spring. With the expansion of the building, a number of parking spaces were lost, he said, so the town has done site work to build back those spaces. The finish work will have to be done sometime next year when the town can pave again, he added.

A fence that ran around the perimeter in back of the police station will also need to be replaced and that will likely be done sometime next year as well, Donovan said.

The station’s fuel tank will also need to be moved, he said.

“With the new construction, the fuel tank ends up in the middle of the parking lot,” Donovan said.

Despite the external site work, the new addition is functionally ready and the police officers are enjoying the new space, Donovan said.

“They are really happy with the way it turned out,” he said.

Return to top