2011-03-17 / The Walrus Says

The Walrus Says

By Jim Munro

Today is the day many of us join the Irish throughout the world in celebrating their wonderful traditions and culture. So, we asked island councilor Bill Murphy what it’s like being one of those very special people.

“When asked what it means to be Irish, I would say my answer has changed over the years. When I was very young, it meant my grandparents came from a country across the ocean and we had lively music and for some reason wore green on St. Patrick’s Day.

“As I got older and learned of the history of Ireland, I understood the passion my grandparents had about being Irish. The Irish have overcome a lot of adversity, from being conquered, having an occupation army in the homeland, famine, the mass exodus on ships that were sometimes unsafe and the lack of hospitality in the new homeland.

“I learned that the Irish worked hard to overcome everything that was brought upon them. They adapted and took jobs no one else wanted so they could support themselves and their families. They became the backbone of the cities on the police and fire departments. These were not great jobs but the ones they could get. When faced with problems we look for solutions.

“We are passionate in things we do and love our families most of all. My family has not always been close, but we are family. I strongly believe that family is not a bloodline, but a matter of the heart. At some point in my life I learned to simply say, what can I do to help? That is what my Irish heritage taught me. To be Irish is to be firm in your convictions but understanding of others. If you are in trouble you can count on an Irishman standing beside you lending support.” *** Last week’s mystery movie was no mystery to Elizabeth Mancini, Leah McGowan, Diane Hull, Elena Rembijas and Mary Frances Doss out there in Corning, Calif. The 1952 movie is “The Quiet Man,” directed by John Ford and starring John Wayne and Maureen O’Hara.

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The poser, an Irish tune named “I’ll Tell Me Ma,” drew responses from Elizabeth Mancini and Kath O’Neill. Kath added that the song is on the CD titled “Another Door Opens,” by the Celtic Gathering, a Jamestown-based Celtic band.

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We always smile when politicians say that a local project won’t cost residents anything because it’s being paid for by the state or federal governments. Where do they think that money comes from?

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Regardless of what you may have heard or read, Kate Middleton, fiancée to Prince William, will never be queen of England.

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Leo, a buff-colored 4-month-old male kitten, has been adopted from the Potter League for Animals by islander Barbara Morse. He joins Sonny, a 1-year-old orange male. Barbara said they are getting along well and as we spoke they were chasing each other around the dining room table. “Leo has brought so much joy into our house,” Barbara said.

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Our pussy willow tree is turning white and we saw a robin under it. Hang in there!

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Poser: I will build my love a tower

Near yon’ pure crystal fountain

And on it I will build

All the flowers of the mountain

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Was anyone surprised that building a bridge over the Sakonnet could become such a fiasco?

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Super kudos to Cloud Nine, staffed by volunteers and supported by donations, that last week flew 22 dogs and puppies from North Carolina to the Potter League for Animals in Middletown. Based in Williamsport, Penn., Cloud Nine rescues animals scheduled to be euthanized and flies them to animal leagues throughout the country.

Woof!

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An underrated musical directed by Francis Ford Coppola and released in 1968 told the story of an Irish immigrant who comes to America and encounters racism. What was the film and who starred?

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Not to be upstaged by St. Patrick’s Day, spring will arrive on Sunday.

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Be true!

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Call in your stuff to 829-2760 or 423-0383, or e-mail us at jtnwalrus@hotmail.com. Thank you.

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