2011-06-09 / News

PCD sophomore selected to play on prep school all-star team

By Geoff Campbell


Kayliegh Rooney, a sophomore lacrosse player at Providence Country Day School, was recently chosen to play in the New England Prep School Women’s Lacrosse All-Star game held at Harvard Stadium. Kayliegh learned to play the game from her father, a former All-American who played at Clark University. Kayliegh Rooney, a sophomore lacrosse player at Providence Country Day School, was recently chosen to play in the New England Prep School Women’s Lacrosse All-Star game held at Harvard Stadium. Kayliegh learned to play the game from her father, a former All-American who played at Clark University. Kayliegh Rooney is officially an all star.

Recently chosen to compete in the New England Prep School Women’s Lacrosse All Star game played at Harvard Stadium, Kayliegh is a sophomore standout and top scorer on Providence Country Day girls’ lacrosse team.

Following in her father’s footsteps, Kayliegh began playing lacrosse in the first grade. She said that her father played high school and was an All-American lacrosse player at Clark University.

“His passion became mine,” she said.

Inspired by his daughter’s interest in the sport, Kayleigh’s father Chris created and coached a recreational team for towns on the East Bay. Kayleigh said that the initial call yielded 48 girls. The original effort has since spawned a number of additional teams, according to Kayliegh.

Currently a club player on the Metacomets, an elite lacrosse club that field players all over southern New England, Kayliegh said that she has played with the club since middle school.

Kayliegh can play as both a midfielder and attacker. The chief responsibility of someone playing middie-attack, according to Kayliegh, is to play defense and attack, switching off with the other midfielder. She added that the nature of the middie-attack position requires her to play the entire field, “including midfield transitions and setting up plays.”

“From middie-attack,” she said, “It is easier to score goals because you are usually the second outlet and you have a great [opportunity] for breakaways.”

Kayliegh paused and added, “It’s a lot harder than playing regular attack because there’s more running and more responsibility on defense.”

Kayliegh’s position suits her, evidenced by the 36 goals that she scored this year in 16 games.

Kayliegh scored hat tricks in all but four games this season and began the year with a torrid scoring pace of six goals per game. She said that her record-setting pace was slackened following a combination of two injuries. She suffered a sprained ankle in practice and in a match against St. Andrew’s (Barrington), a stick to the head resulted in a broken nose for Kayliegh and a yellow card for her opponent.

Her selection to the all-star team culminated in a 70-minute game hosted by Harvard University between small prep-school all-stars who had been chosen by coaches in the various prep-school conferences. Providence Country Day is part of the southeastern New England division of the New England Preparatory School Athletic Council. She said that college coaches coached the teams and the attendees to the games included college scouts.

Kayliegh was also recently named to Rhode Island’s All-State First Team and honorable mention by southeastern New England league coaches in the state.

As a freshman at Providence Country Day, Kayliegh started all but two games on a team with 13 seniors that finished in the semifi- nals. They only lost three times all season.

Following graduation last spring, PCD was forced to put two or three experienced players and a freshman goalie on the field this year. The result was a winless season.

Kayliegh spoke of improvement and seemed undaunted by the disappointing season. She pointed to the final game of the season, a playoff contest against Williams Academy (Connecticut) and spoke passionately about the effort of her teammates to dominate ball control in what might be described as the best losing effort of the season.

Born in London, Kayleigh has lived most of her life in Jamestown. Her father’s business opportunity initially took the family across the pond and the yearning of extended family brought them back.

Always active on the field and off, Kayliegh joined PCD in the sixth grade and was a middle school member of the Mock Trial squad and Student Council. As an eighth grader she served as president of the council.

Currently a sophomore, Kayliegh said that her school is a small school with a tight community.

“You really know each classmate and the teachers really get to know you,” she said. “They know who you are and what you love to do.”

On the list of Kayliegh’s favorite activities are lounging at the beach, photography and, of course, lacrosse.

Kayliegh’s photography skills developed as a result of choosing the highly recommended class to meet an art class requirement. During a family vacation to Curacao, Kayliegh began the transition to full-on shutterbug, taking lots of pictures, and as she put it, “ I fell in love with it.”

That spring she was more formally trained giving form and structure to her growing appreciation of the photographic arts.

As fond and committed to lacrosse as Kayliegh is, her enthusiasm ratcheted up when she was asked about college plans and her future in Lacrosse.

“My dream is to become a doctor,” Kayliegh said, “So whatever schools I get into, I want to then get into a good med school, so if I do play in college, it will be division II or III.”

“When I play it’s for fun,” she added. “It’s something that I enjoy.”

Kayliegh said that her medical interest lies in obstetrics and that she would look to do in-vitro surgeries. She added, “I have known for a long time exactly what I want do.”

It’s probably safe to book her an operating room now.

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