2012-05-17 / News

Island’s spring bird count tallies 101 species

The 28th annual Conanicut Island Spring Bird Count took place Saturday, and the weather cooperated, as it was 70 degrees with sunny skies. Sixteen islanders participated – 14 in the field, two from home – and a total of 101 species were counted, including 18 species of warblers. (Last year, 110 species were tallied, and a record-number 20 species of warblers were spotted.)

By noon, there were 97 species found. But four more species – 20 glossy ibises, a pair of Eastern bluebirds, a set of dark-eye juncos and a fish crow– were seen following lunch.

Highlights of the day included a long-tailed duck seen in the West Passage, and the Eastern bluebird couple nesting at Godena Farm. According to Candy Powell, who organizes the bird count, it’s the first time bluebirds have been found nesting in Jamestown as far as anyone knows. She said that it even rivaled the return of the ospreys.

Field observers were Wayne Munns, B.J. Whitehouse, Chris and Candy Powell, Marcie Lindsey, Evelyn Rhodes, Ed Long, Ed Dettmann, Linda Gardrel, Margie Hemp, Chris Ariel, Bruce Foresman, Dick Graefe and Karen Benson. Reporting from home were Gail Chase and Karen Osenton.

The 101 species were: common loon, 3; double-crested cormorant, 39; great blue heron, 1; great egret, 12; snowy egret, 2; little blue heron, 2; glossy ibis, 20; Canada goose, 60; mallard, 26; long-tailed duck, 1; surf scoter, 5; red-breasted merganser, 2; turkey vulture, 14; and osprey, 8.

Also, Cooper’s hawk, 1; redtailed hawk, 10; peregrine falcon, 2; semi-palmated plover, 22; kildeer, 4; greater yellowlegs, 16; lesser yellowlegs, 3; spotted sandpiper, 3; sanderling, 1; least sandpiper, 20; purple sandpiper, 4; ring-billed gull, 2; herring gull, 80; and great black-backed gull, 22.

Also, rock pigeon, 2; mourning dove, 23; black-billed cuckoo, 1; chimney swift, 4; ruby-throated hummingbird, 3; red-bellied woodpecker, 3; downy woodpecker, 11; hairy woodpecker, 1; Northern flicker, 2; Eastern wood pewee, 1; Eastern phoebe, 3; great crested flycatcher, 14; eastern kingbird, 14; tree swallow, 46; and Northern rough-winged swallow, 3.

Also, barn swallow, 36; blue jay, 33; American crow, 37; fish crow, 1; black-capped chickadee, 16; tufted titmouse, 20; white-breasted nuthatch, 3; Carolina wren, 5; house wren, 18; veery, 4; wood thrush, 9; American robin, 110; Eastern bluebird, 2; gray catbird, 134; Northern mockingbird, 17; brown thrasher, 6; starling, 80; and cedar waxwing, 8.

Also, white-eyed vireo, 10; warbling vireo, 8; red-eyed vireo, 7; blue-winged warbler, 5; Nashville warbler, 1; Northern parula, 7; yellow warbler, 131; black-throated blue, 1; yellow-rumped warbler, 4; black-throated green, 5; blackburnian warbler, 1; pine warbler, 1; prairie warbler, 9; palm warbler, 1; bay-breasted warbler, 2; and blackpoll warbler, 3.

Also, black and white warbler, 9; American redstart, 19; ovenbird, 9; Northern waterthrush, 4; common yellowthroat, 15; scarlet tanager, 2; Northern cardinal, 46; rose-breasted grosbeak, 9; Eastern towhee, 65; chipping sparrow, 18; savannah sparrow, 17; saltmarsh sparrow, 2; song sparrow, 35; and white-throated sparrow, 2.

Also, dark-eyed junco, 3; bobolink, 40; red-winged blackbird, 165; common grackle, 41; brownheaded cowbird, 37; Baltimore oriole, 21; orchard oriole, 6; house finch, 22; American goldfinch, 32; and house sparrow, 29,

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