2012-05-17 / News

Jamestown boat finishes second in first leg of Atlantic Cup


Skipper Dave Rearick (below) and co-skipper Matt Scharl enjoyed some success in the first leg of the Atlantic Cup. Rearick’s boat, Bodacious Dream (above), finished third. The Class 40 sailboat will race the second leg beginning Saturday, on a course that stretches from New York City to Newport. Skipper Dave Rearick (below) and co-skipper Matt Scharl enjoyed some success in the first leg of the Atlantic Cup. Rearick’s boat, Bodacious Dream (above), finished third. The Class 40 sailboat will race the second leg beginning Saturday, on a course that stretches from New York City to Newport. On May 11 in Charleston, S.C., Class 40 racing sailboats lined up for the start of the second annual Atlantic Cup, a three-part race featuring two offshore legs and finishing with two days of course racing in Narragansett Bay on Memorial Day weekend.

The first two events are the offshore legs – leg one is Charleston to New York City, a distance of 650 miles. The second leg begins May 19 and travels the course from New York City to Newport – a turning mark off the New Jersey shore makes this leg a distance of 250 miles.

Memorial Day weekend will feature two days of inshore races in Narragansett Bay. The culmination of points from these events will determine the Atlantic Cup championship. The top 3 finishers will split a prize of $30,000.

Of local interest is the Class 40 Bodacious Dream, hailing from Jamestown and sporting sponsorship logos from Jamestown Fish and Conanicut Marine, among others. Sailed by Dave Rearick, along with co-skipper Matt Scharl, the two will sail Bodacious Dream in its first Class 40 competition since launching the boat in Wellington, New Zealand, in December. Rearick sea-trialed the boat in New Zealand before shipping it back to Florida where he has been preparing the Farr-designed Kiwi 40 FC for the Atlantic Cup.

Bodacious Dream did well on its first test. After the first leg the Jamestown boat is third overall. It finished behind the German boat Mare and French vessel Champagne de France. Bodacious Dream was the top finisher out of five American boats. Mare, the leading boat, is being sailed by Jorg Riechers and American Ryan Breymaier.

“We tried to make a plan long before the start and stick to it, and I think that helps when you don’t let other people in on what you’re going to do,” said Breymaier. “The weather conditions might change a little bit, but as long as you sort of stick with the plan you know is right from the beginning, it’s all going to work out in the long run.”

Class 40 racing sailboats are a recent trend in racing. The class was conceived from the need for a shorthanded offshore racer that didn’t require the large budgets of bigger boats, such as the Open 60 racing boats. The Class 40s are designed to a box rule, which limits length, height of rig, depth of keel, weights and stability, but within those parameters gives a designer and sailor freedom to design a boat to their desired sailing specialties.

Cost is controlled by limiting the use of carbon fiber to only the mast and spars, and by requiring fiberglass for hull construction. These restrictions have developed a safe, strong and quite nimble class numbering over 118. The Class 40 sailboats are often doublehanded, across oceans and around the world.

That such an event has landed on North American shores is not to be missed. At least nine of the 15 entrants sport American crewmembers. Notably, Joe Harris and Tristan Mouligne on Gryphon Solo, Emma Creighton and Rob Windsor on Initiatives, Ben Poucher and Tim Fetsch on Icarus, Mike Dreese and Ken Luczynski on Toothface, Mike Hennesy and Christopher Muselear on Dragon, Jeff McFarlane on GDF-Suez, Ryan Breymaier on Mare, and Jesse Naimark-Rowse on Talan.

These amazing boats look like smaller versions of the Open 60s, which were used in their heydays in the BOC Challenge and Around Alone races that used to start in Newport. The Class 40s – including Bodacious Dreams – will come up the coast to their finish in Newport on Sunday, May 20, weather permitting, Rearick says. See them up close and meet the crews at the Newport Shipyard while they are in town to race the inshore races. There they will add local crew: Chris Pike, Christer Still, Skip Mattos, Jeff Urbina, Jay Cross and Jay Hansen.

Bodacious Dream will be at the Conanicut Marina after the races for a couple of weeks as Rearick prepares it to sail to Europe to compete in more Class 40 races as he ramps up to a solo entry in the 2013 Global Ocean Race – a singlehanded circumnavigation race.

Read about Rearick’s Bodacious Dream at BodaciousDream.com.

Read more about the Atlantic Cup at AtlanticCup.org.

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