2013-05-16 / News

Birders spot 102 species


A yellow warbler is perched on a branch along the South Pond trail. The bird is the most common spring warbler in Jamestown – 111 were spotted Sunday during the annual bird count. 
PHOTO BY CHRIS POWELL A yellow warbler is perched on a branch along the South Pond trail. The bird is the most common spring warbler in Jamestown – 111 were spotted Sunday during the annual bird count. PHOTO BY CHRIS POWELL After a postponement Satur­day due to a stormy forecast, the island’s spring bird count was re­scheduled to the following morn­ing – where more rain awaited birders.

Still, nine volunteers showed up with binoculars and their field- identification guides and a total of 102 species were counted, one more than last year.

Volunteers including Wayne Munns, B.J. Whitehouse, Marcie Lindsey, Margie Hemp, Barbara Carton, Cassie Sisti, Bob Bowen and Chris and Candy Powell. Also, Connie Thomas and Evelyn Rhodes reported from home.

As it turned out, after a few rainy hours, the weather slowly improved throughout the day. The noon tally was 95 species, but af­ternoon and home observers added seven more to bring the total once again above 100. (Record is 110 in 2001.) Additions in the after­noon included the green heron, peregrine falcon, sanderling, in­digo bunting, purple finch, brown thrasher, and white-crowned spar­row. Highlights of the day were a Swainson’s thrush at the north end, three peregrine chicks being fed by an adult in the nest box under the Newport Bridge, eastern blue­birds at Fox Hill farm, surf scoters at Beavertail, a Tennessee warbler at Taylor’s Point, and the indigo bunting at Beavertail.

The most popular species were the American Robin (172), red- winged blackbird (149), double- breasted cormorant (133) and the yellow warbler (111). Species seen once were the red-throated loon, black-crowned night her­on, sanderling, northern flicker, Swainson’s thrush, Tennessee war­bler, green heron, yellow-crowned night heron, spotted sandpiper, bank swallow, white-breasted nuthatch, chestnut-sided warbler, purple finch, bobolink, white- crowned sparrow, orchard oriole, indigo bunting, field sparrow and the northern waterthursh. Six os­preys were spotted.

Other notable finds included six ospreys, five great egrets, 11 mourning doves, five ovenbirds, two turkey vultures, 29 Canada geese, four red-tailed hawks, two rock pigeons, seven ruby-throat­ed hummingbirds, eight downy woodpeckers, 11 Baltimore ori­oles and two warbling vireos.

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