2017-05-04 / Front Page

MORE BUSINESSES OPEN AT BOMES

Attorney, tech firm and insurance agent now in village centerpiece
BY RYAN GIBBS


ABOVE: Lisa Carlisle and Krista Hevenor, alongside four board members of the Jamestown Chamber of Commerce, cut the ribbon to their new suite Friday at the Bomes Theatre. Celebrating the opening of the architecture firm were, from left to right, Susan Hackman, Maria Flood, Carlisle, Hevenor, Ben Thomas and Jeff Bush. Below, Carlisle is busy in her new office Tuesday morning. ABOVE: Lisa Carlisle and Krista Hevenor, alongside four board members of the Jamestown Chamber of Commerce, cut the ribbon to their new suite Friday at the Bomes Theatre. Celebrating the opening of the architecture firm were, from left to right, Susan Hackman, Maria Flood, Carlisle, Hevenor, Ben Thomas and Jeff Bush. Below, Carlisle is busy in her new office Tuesday morning. Despite ongoing construction at the Narragansett Avenue landmark, the Bomes Theatre now hosts the commercial district’s newest office space.

The five suites officially have opened and all but one office is occupied. Building owner Elena McCarthy said the four spaces were rented before work even was completed.

“I was really thrilled,” she said. “People rented before they saw them.”

McCarthy always intended for a section of business offices — “a collaborative environment” — to be part of the theater’s renovation. Construction began on that sector after the Island Heron yoga studio opened in October in the building’s rear.

“This has been part of the plan for a long time,” McCarthy said. “A lot of people like to be in a place where they can go next door and have a cup of coffee.”

Built in 1922, the one-story masonry structure with the distinct commercial facade originally was a movie theater called The Palace. It was conceived from a movie projector that was used at the Red Cross hut at Fort Wetherill during World War I. In 1946, Samuel Bomes purchased the building and lent it his name.

Rick Berretta, the general contractor of the renovation, designed the suites.

Architect Lisa Carlisle is among the tenants who moved into one of the suites in mid-April. The theater was the only place in town where she wanted to rent an office.

“I was working for another architect, and one of the reasons I left was because I knew this could be a possibility,” she said. “As an architect, I wanted to find a space that would be unique.”

Carlisle worked closely with Berretta on the project. For example, they both agreed to keep the cathedral ceilings.

“I did have a lot of input,” she said. “When I first decided to rent in here, there were no walls at all. We would always discuss what the possibilities were.”

Carlisle said her office is perfect for meeting clients and also provides a good working environment for her visual designer, Krista Hevenor. Using word of mouth and taking advantage of the foot traffic, Carlisle said her company already has received project inquires. That’s despite the work still being done, which doesn’t bug Carlisle at all.

“I’m used to construction,” she said.

Michael Anderson also moved his Onsite Techs business into the theater. The 7-foot former professional basketball player, who has a degree in business administration from the University of Rhode Island, has been looking to move his 6-year-old company from his home. Anderson said the Bomes was a good fit at a good price for his company, which provides IT support to small businesses and households. Not only can he meet clients there, it gets him out of the house.

Along with Carlisle and Anderson, insurance agent Dan Dwyer and lawyer Kristen Maccini have moved into their suites. All four tenants are Jamestowners.

“We didn’t have to look far to find people,” McCarthy said. “It’s a nice community of people sharing that space.”

The suites share a hallway, which McCarthy plans to decorate with historical pictures of the building. She wants to include other relevant artifacts, such as paper tickets from its days as a movie theater.

As for construction, McCarthy hopes it will be done this summer. A tenant has shown interest in the office at the front, but nothing is set in stone. If an agreement is reached, McCarthy expects that business to be moved in before June. There also is room for a few more businesses depending on how the remaining space is divided, she said.

Return to top