2017-08-31 / News

Loss of water traced back to residential property


Workers excavate the bridge over Great Creek last week in search of a major leak that drained thousands of gallons of water from the towers. Only a minor leak was found. 
PHOTO BY ANDREAVON HOHENLEITEN Workers excavate the bridge over Great Creek last week in search of a major leak that drained thousands of gallons of water from the towers. Only a minor leak was found. PHOTO BY ANDREAVON HOHENLEITEN Traces of chlorine near the Great Creek forced town workers to excavate the North Road bridge, but the culprit for the loss of thousands of gallons of water was a private residence, Town Administrator Andy Nota said.

According to Town Engineer Mike Gray, abnormal pumping from the water department’s realtime tracking system raised a red flag about a potential leak. The chlorine near the Great Creek water main, he said, pointed to damage in that antiquated cast iron pipe.

“We have very predictable pumping,” he said. “It’s a good indicator if there are any problems with the distribution system. We had an idea that there maybe something wrong.”

After digging up earth, however, workers determined only a trickling leak was coming from the Great Creek main.

Nota said the lion’s share of water loss came from a cracked main that runs under a residential home. That problem has since been fixed. Nota and Gray are worried about the main underneath the Great Creek bridge, but because the town plans on re-engineering that span, they are crossing their fingers for a few more years.

“We are trying to hold off on that,” he said. “We don’t want to make that investment for nothing.”

In the meantime, the town also is hiring an outside consultant to identify smaller leaks that aren’t major, but still need repair. “There are several that we know exist,” Nota said.

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