2017-11-02 / Front Page

Storm leaves downed trees rampant in town


Heavy winds early Monday morning tore the copper roof from the fog signal building at Beavertail State Park. Luckily, this was the only damage done to the lighthouse complex. 
PHOTO BY ANDREAVON HOHENLEITEN Heavy winds early Monday morning tore the copper roof from the fog signal building at Beavertail State Park. Luckily, this was the only damage done to the lighthouse complex. PHOTO BY ANDREAVON HOHENLEITEN The town was hampered by power outages and fallen trees as heavy winds and torrential downpour pounded the island Sunday night into Monday morning on the five-year anniversary of Hurricane Sandy.

The storm, with a high wind gust of 81 mph at Conimicut Point, also grounded boats and tore the copper roof from a building at the Beavertail Lighthouse complex.

Ken Duva, superintendent of schools, canceled Monday classes at Melrose and Lawn because of safety concerns. Most schools across Rhode Island also canceled classes for the day.

According to Police Chief Ed Mello, there were no significant accidents or property damage related to the storm, which dropped nearly 3 inches of rain in areas of the Ocean State. However, Mello said emergency personnel was dispatched to roughly 50 different sites be- cause of downed poles, trees and power lines. Public works crews responded at 10 p.m. Sunday and worked 24 hours straight clearing roads, Mello said. Two boats, one at Cranston Cove and another at Mackerel Cove, were ripped from their moorings, he added.


A tree on East Shore Road collapsed onto power lines during Sunday night’s storm, which was spawned from the remnants of Tropical Storm Philippe. A tree on East Shore Road collapsed onto power lines during Sunday night’s storm, which was spawned from the remnants of Tropical Storm Philippe. There were widespread power outages in town, Mello said, but the utility company had that corrected by Monday morning. By Tuesday afternoon, only 16 homes were without power, he said. As of Wednesday morning, National Grid said there still were about 40,000 homes without power statewide, down from a high of 154,000.

At Beavertail, which attracted dozens of visitors Monday to catch glimpses of the 20-foot waves, the roof that was repaired three years ago on the fog signal building was folded up by the wind.


Mac Nathan, 8, from left, Ian Krider, 9, and Logan Sirotin, 9, watch the waves crash into the cliffs Monday afternoon at Beavertail. 
PHOTOS BY ANDREA VON HOHENLEITEN Mac Nathan, 8, from left, Ian Krider, 9, and Logan Sirotin, 9, watch the waves crash into the cliffs Monday afternoon at Beavertail. PHOTOS BY ANDREA VON HOHENLEITEN “It was surprising to see that thing get blown away,” said Varoujan Karentz, a board member of the Beavertail Lighthouse Museum Association. The state Department of Environmental Management will finance repairs to the roof, he said.

Town Administrator Andy Nota said the storm was not declared a disaster by the state, so there is no immediate opportunity to recover costs for overtime and damages. Also, he said, tree work and debris cleanup on private property is the responsibility of the homeowners. He is asking residents not to pile branches or debris along the roads during their clean-up efforts.

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