2018-01-11 / Front Page

‘BOMB CYCLONE’ FAILS TO DETONATE

Storm drops foot of snow; no power outages in town
BY TIM RIEL


A homeowner in the East Passage Estates clears his walkway Friday morning following a nor’easter that dropped a foot of snow onto his yard the previous day. A homeowner in the East Passage Estates clears his walkway Friday morning following a nor’easter that dropped a foot of snow onto his yard the previous day. A nor’easter, which was dramatically tagged a “bomb cyclone” by news outlets across the nation, dropped 12 inches of snow last Thursday in Jamestown with wind gusts reaching 40 mph.

Dubbed Winter Storm Grayson, town officials prepared for the snowstorm by opening the emergency shelter at Melrose School following a reverse 911 weather alert from Police Chief Ed Mello that Wednesday afternoon. A 24-hour parking ban also was put into effect while Town Hall was designated as a warming center.

Despite the daunting predictions, there were no major accidents or injuries, according to Mello.

“It clearly would have been a game-changer had we lost power, but we were fortunate,” he said. “People abided by our cautions to stay off the roads.”


Anderson Caldwell enjoys the winter wonderland on Intrepid Lane last Thursday with his dog Sunny. This is the most snow the 15-month-old has ever seen in town. Anderson Caldwell enjoys the winter wonderland on Intrepid Lane last Thursday with his dog Sunny. This is the most snow the 15-month-old has ever seen in town. Town Engineer Mike Gray dispatched 10 crews early Thursday morning to keep the roads clear. The plows worked through midnight before returning at 5 a.m. Friday.

“They did a great job, but we had some equipment problems,” Gray said. “Our fleet is getting older. The storm itself was very difficult. We were getting 2 inches per hour during the peak. The drivers couldn’t see 20 feet in front of them because of the windblown snow. There were whiteout conditions for a couple of hours.”

Trucks, tractors and backhoes were dispatched again from Saturday through Tuesday morning to remove excess snow downtown and at the schools. According to Town Administrator Andy Nota, accumulation along Narragansett Avenue on the sidewalks and road shoulders created a safety hazard. Nota also wanted the commercial district to be open for business.


Talon Comeford, 8, sleds down Shoreby Hill on his saucer Friday afternoon. 
PHOTOS BYANDREA VON HOHENLEITEN Talon Comeford, 8, sleds down Shoreby Hill on his saucer Friday afternoon. PHOTOS BYANDREA VON HOHENLEITEN “We basically had a lane and a half,” he said. “That avenue is a critical element for us.”

To clean the village, tractors loaded mounds of snow into dump trucks, which were then transported to East Ferry and ultimately Fort Getty. When the snow melts at the park, Gray said he will dispatch street sweepers to keep the chemicals from washing into the bay.

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